Nine of Wands: Come at Me

I’ve been feeling like the Julian De Burgh and Mary Guinan’s Celtic Nine of Wands lately. I started my internship at school, and it is intense. Fulfilling, but intense. It’s really made the social work cohort bond together.
In tarot, the number nine signifies a climax, before the denouement of the ten. Ten wraps everything up, while nine is a continuation of the heavy action of the situation (represented by the eight), and/or a response to the demands placed by the situation. The Nine of Wands is a call to gather your troops, to hold steady, and to be watchful.

IMG_1434

You don’t have to go it alone. You may be heading towards victory, with support in your corner. Gather your cheering squad. Assemble your fleet. At least you’ll know you have people to comfort you if things don’t turn out the way you wanted.

IMG_1435
You may be struggling, but you may also feel strong. You have something to lean on, whether that be an ideal or a goal. You’ve already accomplished quite a bit. The symbol on the man’s pendant is the rune Algiz, which is the rune of protection (a very powerful rune and one of the runes I feel very attached to). The Algiz on the pendant gives a sense of hope. Sometimes, when I’m looking at the symbol on the pendant, my brain will see the rune Tyr, which stands for steadfastness and strength. The rune takes its name from the Norse god Tyr, who put his hand in the sun devouring wolf Fenrir’s mouth to prove his word. The Nine of Wands may be telling you to prepare for a similar test. You may be bleeding, but you will be damned if you let the bastards take you down.

IMG_1437
Freya stands, sharp eyed and determined, before the staves she has erected. What is behind the fence she has made? On the other hand, she may be standing behind the staves, to protect herself. It does not change her expression. Sometimes, the best thing to do is watch and wait, and know that you can handle whatever may come. Like Scar sings, “Be prepared.”

IMG_1436

We may be stripped of everything, sitting butt naked in a cell, and still be a BAMF. Fight the good fight. Anger may be all that keeps you going, but you still have determination, and you still have one weapon left, something that the guards missed.
If you feel everything has been taken from you, what is the one thing you still have? An imagination to help you escape? Righteous anger? You may have more power than you think.
Are you prepared for any eventuality?

Advertisements

The Chariot

When I see the Chariot in the upright position, it makes me think of smooth sailing. It can mean literal travel, or accomplishing a goal. It signifies transitions.

IMG_1457

The Chariot in the Celtic Deck is drawn by creepy horses. Maybe that’s a good thing, though. They scare everything out of the way. The Questioner here is very driven to accomplish the task at hand, or they will soon be inspired. There may be a scary intensity to the Questioner. Anger may be a motivator. The Questioner may also feel very restless and reckless. They may be craving an adventure.
Sometimes, there is a hint of caution in the Chariot–don’t go too fast, don’t make your turns too sharp. Stay in control.

IMG_1458
In contrast, Barbara G. Walker’s Chariot shows a calm, elegant rider. He isn’t even holding on to any reins, just trusting the horses to carry him down the red carpet. However, he has to stay alert, otherwise, the horses will just wander off in opposite directions. These two steeds, one black, the other white, may symbolize opposing forces working on the Questioner. These may be internal, or external. However, depending on the spread and the question, the Questioner may be successfully moving forward while holding these contradictions in balance.
The symbol on the front of the chariot is the glyph for Hermes, messenger of the gods, god of words. Maybe a message will be delivered for the Questioner.

IMG_1456

Rhiannon, Celtic goddess, is the goddess for the Chariot in the Goddess deck. She rides an ethereal white horse. Kris Waldherr writes that she “symbolizes the unceasing force of movement that pulls all of life along with it” (The Goddess Tarot, p. 29). Her three birds sing songs that can carry the dead to life, and the living into death (p. 30).
A horse carries people to Tir na Nog, the Otherworld of youth, beauty, and joy.

IMG_1459

Black is mystery, the unknown, the nighttime and dreams. Silver is feminine magic, and the Moon. White is knowledge. Gold is masculine power, and the warm sun that lights the day. They are in perfect balance, just like the yin/yang symbol on the chariot. The rider is not only confident, but joyous. The sun shines upon him and his horses. Things are going really well–either he’s got such strong control that he doesn’t need reins, or he is much beloved by his horses, so he can rest in the happiness of trust, in himself and in his surroundings. He’s taken the first steps and is now on a roll (Get it?). The Questioner may do the same, depending on the reading.
His canopy is clear night sky, which makes me think of “traversing across the stars,” and the purple is for royalty, and also the color for Sagittarius, sign of the wanderer. It’s also the color of the crown chakra, the chakra that connects us to higher powers and our greatest possible selves. Forging this connection and reaching our potential can and has been compared to a journey.

I’ve been interested in the Chariot from an astrological point of view, in particular because it is associated with Luna, my sun sign. I never really understood the connection between the Chariot and Luna, but this site was very helpful: Check it! Aeclectic is a great site to browsed, and now the Chariot and Luna make a lot more sense. The Chariot is full of contradictions, like sun/moon, black/white, taking risks/being cautious. Luna is like that too. Lunas crave affection, but can push people away with moods as welcoming as barbed wire when they need affection the most. We’re homebodies, but also crave adventure and recognition.

When reversed, the Chariot usually symbolizes two things, frustration and stagnation, and/or recklessness and losing control. In this case, it serves as a heads-up. Once, I got the Chariot during a reading and was told to be careful for any car issues.

An Enchanting Child: The Page of Cups

To me, the Page (or Princess) of Cups is the Magical Child archetype Caroline Myss speaks about. She’s ethereal, loving, and imaginative.
If the Page/Princess of Cups represents a person (as the Court cards are wont to do), that person will have Water characteristics: intuition, sensitivity, creativity, nurturing, emotional, and loving. Because it is the Page/Princess, this person will probably be a young girl, a child even, though that is not set in stone.

IMG_3633
The Princess of Cups for the Celtic Deck seems fragile and sensitive. She bears a Cup–what that cup might metaphorically hold depends entirely upon your intuition and any surrounding cards–and holds it aloft with a guileless demeanor. What’s interesting about this card, to me, is that the Princess of Cups is clad in gold and red, colors associated with the fiery suit of Wands. I read this to mean that the passion and desire of the Wands are not mutually exclusive with the intuition and nurturing of the Cups. Fire and Water are both very emotional elements, and these opposite elements, metaphorically, marry quite well, just like night and day.
I also love the Impressionistic background on this card. It’s so lush and green.

IMG_3627

The Goddess Deck’s Princess of Cups is sipping from her own Cup. Right now, the message I’m feeling from this card is Jungian–that one’s own subconscious is a limitless resource of inspiration, joy, and/or knowledge. The suit of Cups and Water are aligned with the subconscious.
Kris Waldherr chose the goddess Venus to be the Cup goddess. Cups is the suit for relationships, so the goddess of love was a good choice. Since the Page of Cups is young, the kind of love this card speaks of is first time love, or a freshly blooming love. If reversed, this love may be a little immature, a crushing infatuation or an inconsequential crush.
The lavender of Venus’ gown is a soft, healing color. Mixed with water, it becomes a cleansing tea. It’s threaded with innocent white and intuitive silver. The hopeful innocence and imagination of the Cups is very healing.

IMG_3637

Barbara G. Walker’s Princess of Cups is Elaine of Arthurian fame. She wears the snow white associated with purity. Her robe and cup are red to signify the power of menstrual blood and the womb as are the two crescent moons on the pillars. The cauldron is a symbol of regeneration, rebirth and immortality. The upside down triangle that pins Elaine’s cloak is also a symbol of rebirth and the womb. The interesting scene on the cauldron is a depiction of a sacrifice and apotheosis (being made into a deity) (Barbara Walker Tarot, 23). The image also reminds me of Achilles being dipped into the River Styx by Thetis to gain immortality–though it’s certainly not an exact likeness. The water sign Pisces is the sign of martyrdom and sacrifice, so it’s no wonder that my most esoteric deck uses the Cups to show the theme.
Elaine also looks like an initiate into a great mystery. Mysteries and spirituality are very Watery areas, as seen in Pisces (the sign of mystics) and Scorpio (the sign of Hecate and the Phoenix), so it’s another apropos subject for the Watery Cups to drop.

IMG_3625

Robin Wood’s Page of Cups is an artist–she has a palette hanging from her belt. Making art is about perception. What does she see coming out of her cup? What do you see? Is it a bird, or a fish?
Although she is young, the Page of Cups is quite intuitive. She is also resilient and adaptive, like the lotuses on the hem of her skirt and sleeve. Lotuses grow out of disgusting muck, and balanced people can take emotional mayhem and make it into something lovely, like a poem, or at least something useful, like a life lesson.
Page of Cups people have a soft, nurturing moon-like glow. They are gentle and sensitive, yet very strong and self-assured when they are feeling happy and secure. The Page of Cups gazes confidently at her cup and what is flying out of it–the fish that swims in the subconscious and finds treasure, or the silver bird that soars high and flies far, seeing all the possibilities. Her mouth curves into an assessing smile. She seems to be thinking–what can I make real today? Her imagination is as pure as her heart. Creating is still fun, and feelings, both hers and other people’s, are not scary, but opportunities for learning, helping, and healing.

If you see the upright Page of Cups regarding a situation, it is a good sign, especially if it is regards
People associated with the Page of Cups:
A nurturing child
A playful, creative person
An affectionate, trusting person
Someone who is sensitive and intuitive beyond her years
A person undergoing a spiritual initiation, like First Holy Communion or Confirmation
Children who are Luna, Scorpio, and Pisces

Reversed (Shadowy Pages):
Whiners
People who take themselves way too seriously
People who are throw tantrumy and weepy

Reversed Situations:
A creative block
High anxiety
A loss of empathy
Relying too much on the brain and not enough on emotion when making a decision

Sun, Sun, Sun, here it comes!

Now is a time of celebration. Specifically, it is the celebration of the end of suffering. Christ rises after death. The Israelites were freed from slavery. Winter is finally gone–the months of dark and cold have been warmed away. The flora and fauna know it, too. They awaken from their sleep, babies are born, and shoots spring from the snow-damp soil. It is a Phoenix time. The sun blazes bright and beautiful. That which was seemingly dead stirs and stretches.

The Sun card is a card of triumph, of energy, of joy, of hope, and of healing. Even reversed, it simply means that the happiness and victory may come later rather than sooner, but it will come. It means success, rebirth, new ideas, and new babies.

IMG_3634

Barbara G. Walker shows us two small towheaded children (the one on the left looks like a Kewpie doll!), joining hands and holding a chain of ivy. The children are in the Garden of Eden. Other possible meanings for the wall are that it is a symbol of safety, or of being a blank slate, full of possibility. The nudity of the children symbolizes innocence and freedom.
The Sun is the ruling heavenly body of the astrological sign Leo. Leo is the ‘child’ of the zodiac, full of fun and bliss.

IMG_3638
Robin Wood also chose the child as the symbol of the Sun, reflecting innocent joy. The child also is sign of rebirth, of newness. The sunflowers bloom brightly in the background. Robin Wood wrote that she painted four, one for each element, and a couple not yet opened to show the wonderful surprises in store for the questioner. The white roses in the baby’s hair are for pure love, and his red feather, like his banner, represent courage, adventure, and a flair for life. At the top of the banner is a little golden hawk, a bird associated with courage, freedom, and the sun. The hawk is an avatar of Horus, the Egyptian god of the sky.
The pony is white as a cloud, for purity, and his eyes are sky-blue. Everything is clear and lucid.

IMG_3631
Mary Guinan drew a strong, confident warrior for Julian De Burgh’s Celtic Deck. Instead of the childlike joy of Walker and Wood’s decks, the Celtic Deck emphasizes the bravery and power of the sun. Leo is the child of the zodiac, but it is also the Lion–regal and majestic. The Celtic sun warrior is a protector and a path blazer.

 

IMG_3629

Kris Waldherr chose the Zorya to represent the Sun in her Goddess deck. The Zorya are a triune goddess (who may be seen as Maiden, Mother/Lover, Wise Woman but not necessarily) from Russian folklore. In her The Book of Goddesses, Kris Waldherr explains that the Zorya attend to Dazbog, the sun god. The first (or Maiden) is Utrennyaya, or Morning Star; the second (Mother/Lover) is Vechernyaya, or the Evening Star; and the third (Wise Woman) is Zorya, or midnight. Utrennyaya opens the gates for Dazbog to ride across the sky. In the evening, Vechernyaya opens the gate to let him back in. Zorya watches over the sky until the gates open again.
The three women, like the Celtic warrior, are also guardians. They watch over the universe, and keep the doomsday hound, Simargl, in check. The Sun card is a sign that the questioner is guarded and guided by the universe. There is synchronicity and serendipity. Things may seem to be falling into place.

The Sun card is a card of good tidings. It tells of good things to come and success in an endeavor. If representing a person, it indicates a happy, bright person who will bring cheer to the questioner’s life, or help them reach their dreams. It may also symbolize a new baby. Alternately, it could mean that the person is fiercely protective of the questioner and her happiness.

If it represents an aspect of the questioner, it means that the questioner brings happiness to those around him, and may be the center of attention. The questioner may also be feeling very brave, and willing to take risks.

Celebration! The Three of Cups

The Three of Cups is a happy card.  Just look at Robin Wood’s card:

You see? Just look at the pink-garbed blonde on the left! She’s thrilled! They all are so happy to see you!

The Three of Cups is all about celebration.  This celebration may be a get-together with friends, a family reunion, a cast party after a great run…anything you can imagine.  While the participants in the joyous occasion may be any gender, this card has a feminine feel to it.

The women are surrounded by green growing things, and flowers and fruit.  This is a time of growth for the questioner, but this is a happy growth.

The three women traditionally associated with this card are the feminine triad of Maiden, Mother, and Crone.

 

Here, Barbara G. Walker shows the three iconic women, and titles the card “Grace.”  The person for whom this card is drawn is graced.  He or she is blessed with contentment, joy, and good company.

 

You may have noticed that both Barbara G. Walker and Robin Wood have drawn a blonde, a brunette, and a redhead.  The blonde symbolizes the Maiden, the redhead the Wife or Mother, and the brunette the Wise Woman.  On a deeper level, this card is one of feminine power–the potential and purity of the Maiden, the fertility of the Wife/Mother, and the experience of the Wise Woman.  By ‘purity’ I don’t mean virginity, but something more like the mindset of the Fool.  Our Maiden here is open, enthusiastic, and curious.  By fertility, I don’t mean necessarily pregnancy, thought that is a possibility, but also the birth of new ideas and creativity.  The Wife/Mother is self-assured. She is the symbolic Wife/Mother of her passions–represented by the color of her hair.  She is generous, a trait that continues with the Wise Woman.  The Wise Woman has dark hair, alluding to her knowledge of mysteries, and her intuition.

The Wise Women is normally seen as an old woman with silver hair.  The Three of Cups shows three young women because this card is associated with new romances, new babies, and weddings (Cups are associated with romantic relationships and family), as well as coming-of-age ceremonies, particularly for young women.

 

 

Kris Waldherr includes an older women with silver hair in her Three of Cups.  This card looks like it could be depicting the young woman’s initiation.  There is a white gown, for purity, pink for love, and purple for royalty.

The Three of Cups for Julian De Burgh’s Celtic deck shows five people, the traditional three and a couple anticipating the birth of their baby. They have gone from the happy couple of the Two of Cups to the family of the Three.

 

Reversed, the Three of Cups may symbolize dashed hopes or disillusionment in the area of romance, a wedding, or the birth of a new baby.  Metaphorically, it could also mean frustration in a creative pursuit. On a less depressing note, it could mean that there will be a postponement or rescheduling in one of these areas. You may have to wait a little longer for that wedding, or the fertility treatments may take longer than you thought. Perhaps that art gallery opening or performance got pushed back.  Ask yourself if this, while frustrating, may actually turn out for the best.

She Smells of Gingerbread and Pine Trees: The Queen of Pentacles

The Queen of Pentacles, like any court card, is usually associated with a person in the questioner’s life. She can also represent an aspect of the questioner herself.  Since she is the Queen of Pentacles, she has certain qualities. While the Queen of Swords is the Queen of the modern, jet-set woman, the Queen of Wands the successful social butterfly, and the Queen of Cups the artistic romantic, the Queen of Pentacles (or Coins) is the archetypal nurturing mother or grandmother.

What do you think of when you think of the perfect mother, or grandmother? Probably a warm bed, and yummy food cooked with love, and big hugs. This is someone who is patient, solid, and reliable, someone who knows exactly what to do in a crisis. She pampers, but it’s practical. She will dish out solid advice along with tea, sympathy, and amazing baked goods.

This is a person with wisdom. In fact, this archetype is one of the oldest there is.

This is Erda, an ancient Earth goddess, chosen by Barbara G. Walker to represent the Queen of Pentacles. You’ll notice that she has large, maternal bosoms and wide hips. This speaks to her fertility and nurturing ability. Her cave entrance leads to the warm, dark womb, where all life begins and ends.  Her pentacle promises abundance and protection.  The word “Earth” comes from Erda’s name, and the word material (which used to imply rocks and plants and all things from the earth) has the same root as Mother.

Kris Waldherr chose a different goddess for her deck. Lakshmi is the goddess of wealth and beauty in Hinduism.  Her beautiful costumes and jewelry underscore this association. Queen of Pentacles people, with their practicality and good sense, can accumulate quite a bit of wealth. Out of balance, they can be miserly, but in balance they are generous, including with themselves, and love fabulous things.  Lakshmi is known for giving riches to those she loves, just like Queen of Pentacles people.

Please do not think that this Queen can only be seen in women.  Men, too, can be nurturing, giving, and sage with advice.

Robin Wood’s Queen of Pentacles cradles a Pentacle gently, looking at it with loving eyes.  She proves, along with Lakshmi, that the Queen of Pentacles is not necessarily an older woman.  In fact, Pentacles women can be very sensual, because of the alignment with Earth, and its material blessings. The Queen here is also fertile and abundant–she is surrounded by flowers, fruits, vegetables, and our favorite little fornicators, bunnies. Her green gown and orange apron make her one with the Earth’s grass and leaves, and her purple embellishments symbolize richness, royalty, and abundance.

Mary Guinan’s Queen of Pentacles, for Julian De Burgh’s Celtic Deck, is also decked in orange and green. Her red hair is different from the brunette associated with Pentacles court cards, but I like it.  It makes me think of the marriage of Earth and Fire, with volcanos and magma flowing underground. There’s a kinetic energy along with practicality and reliability associated with Earth.  Her arms and gaze are open, waiting to hear about your issues. She will be a fabulous listener, and then she’ll clap her hands and say, “okay, here’s what you gotta do! Let’s go!”

Archetypes/People associated with the Queen of Pentacles:
–Nurturing Mothers and Grandmothers who are practical and loving (and men who have these traits)
–Gardeners
–Sensual people who love textures, colors, and fine things
–Great chefs
–Pregnant women, expectant fathers preparing a nest
–People with a gift for money management and are extremely generous.

Out of balance, Shadow Queen of Pentacles:
–cold, hard parents who care more about wealth than family
–a nosy, bossy person
–a lazy person
–a stingy miser
–someone who can’t even nurture herself, preferring to work herself to sickness

A Spread to Keep You Steady

Dear readers,

exciting things. I am getting ready to embark further on this journey of becoming a therapist, and have been doing readings at the local metaphysical bookstore!

 

One of my favorite spreads to do to help get a feel for aspects in a questioner’s life is the pentacle spread.

 

For this spread, I chose the Robin Wood deck.  The Page of Wands in the center represents the questioner for this month. Once a month is a good way to use this spread.  The second card, representing the element of Earth, is directly to the left of the center card (the reader’s left. You will see). The third card is placed directly above the second and represents the element of Air.  Crowning the center card (here the Page of Wands) is the Spirit card.  Going downward, the fourth card is placed to the upper right of the center card, and the fifth card directly below it.  These represent Water and Fire, respectively.

 

My dear friend, wheresmytower (who also runs onerunetofindthem), who taught me this spread, places the cards in a different order. She places the center card, followed by Earth, Spirit, Water, Air, and Fire, in that order and in those positions. Do what feels best for you.  Also, depending on the reader, the elements may be in different positions. What’s important is that the Spirit card is always on top, and that the reader is consistent whenever he uses the spread.

It is also a good idea to look at the cards as a group, and see how they relate to each other, as well as individually.

 

This month, the questioner feels a strong enthusiasm for life.  There’s a lot of fun and shenanigans.  There is an anticipation, an excitement. The questioner is looking forward to an active social life.  In these social interactions, there will be a sharing of ideas and great support (the wand’s glow represents the bright idea).

 

The second card, the Earth card, represents physical and financial health in the questioner’s life.  It represents emotional security as well.  It represents how practical and realistic the questioner can/should be.

9 of Swords, in the Earth position.  The impression from this is that the questioner is anxious about changing circumstances.  She needs to take on more responsibility, and this is frightening. There is a change in how finances will be coming on, and what can be done with that money.

 

The next card is Air, right above Earth.  Air represents mental acuity, obstacles and how to get over them, communication, and travel.  For this questioner, the Emperor is in the Air position.  This indicates intelligence and confidence, providing a nice antidote to the anxiety of the 9 of Swords in the Earth position.

 

The Spirit position can indicate the essence of the matter, the aspect that the questioner can best focus on. It can also indicate an outcome to avoid or the best possible outcome, depending on the other cards. In this instance, the Spirit card is the lovely 3 of Cups!

 

This is awesome! The questioner is due for some celebration with loved ones. There is much to celebrate! The questioner should be proud of herself for what she has accomplished so far on this path to a new life! She has enthusiasm, confidence, and energy, and smarts. The path she is striking is a good one, and her intuition to take it is correct.

 

Next is Water, right next to the Spirit card on the reader’s right. This represents creativity, emotions, romance, and the subconscious.  At home in his element is the King of Cups.

The questioner, who has been apart from her fiance (not separated emotionally, just physically), will have a wonderful, romantic time with him. She has greatly missed him. Also, I would add that there is a feeling of great compassion on the part of the questioner (necessary for her line of work) as well as a lot of great, creative ideas (she has been keeping a notebook).

 

Last is the Fire position.  The Fire position is the position of energy and passion, specifically energy and passion made bringing dreams into reality.

 

The 3 of Swords, in this position for this reading, seems to show a sadness on the part of the questioner, a grief for the path she was taking, but is now leaving for other options. She feels regret that things didn’t work out with her original career path. These feelings are natural. She should allow herself to feel them.  However, she only has to look at the overwhelmingly positive cards in this spread–The Emperor in the Air position, the Three of Cups in the Spirit position, and the King of Cups in the Water position, to find solace. She is making the right decision.

Above is the complete spread. It is important to examine the cards in their respective positions individually and together. This is a great spread to do once a month, or even once a day, just to get a gauge for where you are.

The Two-Path Spread: For When You Need to Make a Decision

With special thanks to wheresmytower.wordpress.com!

 

The Two-Path Spread is a very useful spread, especially if you are indecisive or anxious.  It cannot help you with little decisions, such as whether to choose between the sticky toffee pudding or the chocolate covered strawberries (that’s a win-win situation anyway).

 

 

Above is a picture of a two-path spread, using Robin Wood’s Deck.  The querent is wondering whether to stay in his current location, or move.

 

The first card you place, the single card on the left, is where the querent is right now.  In this case, it is the Two of Cups.

A major factor in the querent’s decision is the fact that his fianceé lives in the state he will be moving to.  He has been lonely without her, but the relationship is very strong.  Also, after some tension in other areas of the querent’s life, things have finally reached a place of peace and harmony.

 

 

Next, lay down three cards.  These three cards represent what will happen if one course of action is chosen. The first card is the positive outcome from the action.  In this case, it is the Eight of Pentacles. If the querent chooses to move, there will be an opportunity to learn and grow, and find meaningful work.  He will learn practical life skills.

 

The second card from the left is the negative aspect of the choice. Here, it is the Page of Pentacles.  The negative side, or “con” of this decision to move will be that he will feel very young and inexperienced (and the querent is young), even naive, especially in regards to finances and the practical aspects of living.  However, he will be a quick study about these matters.

 

The third card in the row is the final outcome. This is the the Hanged Man. The querent, if he chooses to move, will have to make some sacrifices. His eyes will be opened to the real world, and what he can do in it.  It will be a real coming of age. It might not be too comfortable, but he will not be the same.

 

The second row represents the second choice. In this case, it is choosing to stay.

 

The querent had moved to his current home fairly recently.  Since he had been there, he had found creative inspiration and motivation, and he was in love with the area’s beauty.  It makes sense that these trends would continue, as seen by the presence of the King of Cups in the positive “pro” position.

 

On the negative side, he would feel a restlessness and impatience. This is represented by the Three of Wands in the negative “con” position.

 

The negativity is belied by the final outcome of the Four of Wands.  If he stays in his current home, there will be cause for celebration. There will be a reward–his wedding will happen, and it will be all the sweeter for the waiting for the right moment. Also, the time he has spent honing his creative craft will be fruitful.

 

In summation:

 

Card Number 1: The inquirer at present, the situation at hand.

Row 1: The First Choice

Card Number 2: The Positive side of the choice

Card Number 3: The Negative side of the choice

Card Number 4: The Final Outcome

 

Row 2: The Second Choice

Card Number 5: The Positive

Card Number 6: The Negative

Card Number 7: the Final Outcome

 

Prosperity and Security: The Ten of Pentacles

As a rule of thumb, when you see a ten in a reading, it usually means the end of one cycle and the beginning of another.  Each suit carries a different set of themes, but, of course, we must remember to be flexible in the reading of any card.  If a card is saying something to you that’s different from the “normal” reading, by all means, go with it!

Pentacles, also called Coins, represent the element of Earth. As such, they symbolize wealth, prosperity, security, comfort, sensuality, and health.

 

Robin Wood’s Ten of Pentacles is a joyous card.

The Ten of Pentacles (or Coins), as drawn by Robin Wood, shows not only material wealth, but emotional and spiritual wealth, as well.  The family is clearly a happy one.  The grandfather is serene, the children are generous with their love, and the golden dog (gold being the color of abundance) is loyal and adoring.  Even the couple in the background, underneath the archway (more on that later) are happily conversing! The old man can be seen as the personification of wisdom and hard work, which lead to prosperity.

Like all of Robin Wood’s cards, there is amazing detail in the Ten of Pentacles.  Pay attention to the particular details that stand out to you. It may be the flowers that the young boy is handing to his Grandfather, or the sun etched into the wood in the corner.

 

Robin Wood has decorated her Pentacles with pentagrams. Pentagrams in and of themselves are very protective–Christians believe that pentagrams symbolize the five wounds of Christ, as well as the five senses, and Pagans see it as a symbol of the five elements bound together with spirit, which is the top point.  This symbol of protection, wholeness, and unity can also be seen in the Pentacle suits of the Celtic and Barbara G. Walker decks.

 

 

The Celtic Deck, like Robin Wood’s deck, shows a happy, prosperous family. The arch over the family’s heads represents security and union, and the braids also symbolize a joining together in a strong  family bond.  The pentagrams are there, too, giving care and protection.

 

Like all of the Pentacles in Kris Waldherr’s Goddess Deck, the Ten of Pentacles is represented by the Goddess Lakshmi, the Hindu Goddess of Prosperity, Abundance, Beauty, and Pleasure.  The tree on the card is ripe with Coins, which may represent material wealth or opportunities. Depending on the reading, these opportunities may be financial, educational, social, or romantic. Since Pentacles/Coins also represent physical reality, they may also indicate robust health or healing.  The grass on the card, and even the flowers along the border, are fresh and bright, underscoring fertility.

 

The archway, as I am seeing it right now, symbolizes a doorway to a new way of life, or a new, joyful sensual experience. This is fitting, as the 10s are the end of an old cycle and the beginning of a new one. I also see it as a symbol of security, just as it was a symbol of security on the 10 of Pentacles for the Robin Wood and Celtic Decks.  What do you see when you look at an archway?

 

Kris Waldherr does not use the pentagram on her Pentacles.  Instead, she uses a lotus flower. Lotuses are the symbols of the goddess Lakshmi.  Lotuses are prized for their abilities to rise out of the murkiest, muddiest waters, inspiring people to rise above their circumstances.

 

 

Barbara G. Walker’s Ten of Pentacles is subtitled “Protection.” It is in agreement with the preceding decks that the Ten of Pentacles/Coins represents security.  Here, however, it has a more mysterious, esoteric meaning. The young woman on the card is connected to the circle of pentagrams by a red cord, suggesting the umbilical cord.  She is tapping into the fertile, protecting energies of the Earth. The circle of Pentacles reminds us of the cyclical nature of the cards, and that the ten represents both an end and a beginning.

 

We can also see the young woman is as a weaver.  She is weaving a strong, healing charm in her circle of pentacles, and her thread is thick with bright red life.

 

The Ten of Pentacles, like the Ten of Cups, generally represents good, healing, joyous energies.  If you choose to read cards reversed, it can mean a thwarting of the dreams they represent, or simply a postponement of their attainment.